Search / 21 results found

from
to
  • Updated

The guitarist has practiced gently stunning, fiery improv on nearly 20 albums, the most recent of which is With the Wind and the Rain, released by Capri Records in January. His CD-release celebration includes a Santa Fe Music Collective-sponsored stop at the Museum Hill Café.

The band that set jazz on its head in some new ways starting with 2001’s The Bad Plus, billing itself as “the loudest piano trio ever,” takes on Igor Stravinsky’s powerful and cacophonic 1913 ballet.

  • Updated

Jazz vocalist Lori Carsillo sounds like she’s smiling when she sings. She has a gorgeous voice, like velvet, with a shivery vibrato. On her new album, Sugar & Smoke, she covers songs that were done four or five decades ago by the likes of Julie London, Tony Bennett, Abbey Lincoln, and Mel Tormé. 

  • Updated

A legend about Oscar Peterson has it that a skeptical jazz critic went to one of the pianist’s later concerts to verify the common adage that Peterson played like four pianists at once. When asked whether Peterson still lived up to his reputation, the peevish critic said, “Nah, he doesn’t sound like four pianists. Only two.”

Guitarist John Abercrombie and his band — pianist Marc Copland, bassist Drew Gress, and drummer Joey Baron — offer a program of mostly gentle jazzy music, with an occasional Hitchcock theme. It first shows up in “Vertigo,” and it is a very pleasant sort of vertigo they portray. The steamier “LST” and beautiful “Bacharach” are fascinating examples of how piano and guitar can work together and off each other — and Abercrombie hasn’t featured a pianist for more than 30 years.

  • Updated

On the first Monday evening of 2014, James T. Baker was crooning a bluesy original about whiskey, wine, and women at Duel Brewing. The capacity audience did not seem to mind that beer was not on Baker’s lyrical list — there was plenty of that arrayed on the tables and bar in the taproom, which opened last summer.