The Devil is in the details

Joan Myers, Monument Valley, UT (2021), archival pigment ink print; courtesy Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

She could be photographing along the route the pilgrims took to reach Santiago de Compostela in Spain in the Middle Ages; contrasting the elements of fire and ice in trips to active volcanoes and Antarctica; documenting World War II-era Japanese relocation camps on U.S. soil; or illuminating the beauty of threatened habitats in the jungles of India.

Arizona-based Joan Myers remains an intrepid, adventurous photographer, whose projects often take her to some of the world’s most remote and difficult-to-reach locations but with an eye towards creating a dialogue around the pressing issues of our times, such as the climate crisis and the impact of humankind on the landscape.

In her book, Where the Buffalo Roamed (Damiani Editore, 148 pages, 2019, $50), she turned to a subject closer to home: the myth of the American West. And it’s one she’s expanded on in a new monograph, The Devil’s Highway: On the Road in the American West (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas Press, 168 pages, $45).

The Devil is in the details
The Devil is in the details

Joan Myers, Conway, Texas (2020), archival pigment ink print; courtesy Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

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