Native Arts: markets and museum exhibits

Artist markets

Free Indian Market

8 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 21, and Sunday, Aug. 22



Federal Park, Washington Avenue and South Federal Place (across from the Scottish Rite Temple)

More than 500 Native elders selling artwork; featuring music, dance, and food, as well as a silent auction. Free admission.

IAIA Recent Graduate Art Market

7 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 21, and Sunday, Aug. 22

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, 108 Cathedral Pl.

505-428-5899; iaia.edu/happenings

The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) hosts an art market by alumni from 2016–2021. Booth fees benefit the Native American Club at the Academy for Technology and the Classics. Free admission.

Pathways: Native Arts Festival

9 a.m.–5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20, and Saturday, Aug. 21, 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

Sunday, Aug. 22

Buffalo Thunder Resort Casino, 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail

New artist market from the Poeh Cultural Center and Pojoaque Pueblo, featuring 300 artist booths as well as music, dance, food, and entertainment. The fundraiser and silent auction runs at 6 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 20, to benefit The Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women. Free admission to the festival.

SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market

8 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 21, and Sunday, Aug. 22

Santa Fe Plaza

Over 1,100 Native artists from the U.S. and Canada sell their artwork. Don’t miss the Indigenous Fashion Show at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 22, at Santa Fe Community Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St. ($30). Admission to the art market is $20 Saturday; $15 Sunday; $35 weekend pass. Capacity is limited and advance tickets are required.

Sovereign Santa Fe

10 a.m.–8 p.m. Friday Aug. 20, and Saturday, Aug. 21

Lumpkins Ballroom & Mezzanine, La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E. San Francisco St.

Contemporary art by more than 50 Native artists, as well as a vendor market for products and services. Free admission.

Wheelwright Artists Market

8 a.m.–4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20, and Saturday, Aug. 21

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, 704 Camino Lejo

505-982-4636, wheelwright.org

Outdoor invitational artist market hosted by The Case Trading Post.

Free admission.

At the museums

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

108 Cathedral Pl.

505-983-8900, iaia.edu/mocna

Story Paintings: A Mythological Narrative told by the Creatures of the Anthropocene

Public reception: 5–7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20

Rebecca Lee Kunz (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma) reimagines Cherokee mythology through the lens of the animals living in the contemporary epoch of the post-industrial world and global climate change. In mixed- media drawing and printmaking, these characters share space with historical symbology, as well as new translations of ancient petroglyph forms. Through Oct. 20.

Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology

Public reception: 5–7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20

International Indigenous artists respond to the impacts of nuclear testing, nuclear accidents, and uranium mining on Native peoples and the environ ment. The traveling exhibition and catalog give artists a voice to address the long-term effects of these man-made disasters on Indigenous communities. Through Jan, 23, 2022.

Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

710 Camino Lejo

Collecting Jewelry: Curator H.P. Mera’s Trip to Navajo Country in 1932

Harry P. Mera visited 80 trading posts to collect jewelry that was handmade from silver coins or ingots of silver before the general availability of advanced mechanical tools and commercial commodities. Through Dec. 1.

A Place in Clay

Finding inspiration in both her family’s artistic practices and the envi ronment of Jemez Pueblo, Kathleen Wall ask questions surrounding food sovereignty, language, and connection to place. Through May 16, 2022.

Clearly Indigenous: Native Visions Reimagined in Glass

A groundbreaking exhibit of works in glass by 33 Indigenous artists, plus leading glass artist Dale Chihuly who introduced glass art to Indian Country. Through June 16, 2022.

New Mexico Museum of Art

107 W. Palace Ave.

505-476-5072; nmartmuseum.org

Storytellers: Narrative Art and the West

This exhibit explores ways that artists have told stories about the

Southwest. Through Feb. 13, 2022.

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian

704 Camino Lejo

505-982-4636; wheelwright.org

Indigenous Women: Border Matters

Four Indigenous women — Makaye Lewis, Daisy Quezada Ureña, M. Jenea Sanchez, and Gabriela Muñoz — explore issues on both sides of border between the United States and Mexico, guided by contemporary perspec- tives on identity, self-determination, and human rights. Through Oct. 3.

Shonto Begay: Eyes of the World

Shonto Begay’s autobiographical paintings narrate his connection to the Navajo landscape, personal histories, and cosmology. Through Oct. 3.

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