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Krista Gallegos, right, gives Tim Zimmerman, 67, a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine Wednesday at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center’s specialty clinic. Zimmerman was eligible for the booster because he has a low white blood cell count caused by chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The U.S. plans to make booster shots more widely available in late September as infections rise from the delta variant.

Medical professionals in the region see no reason for booster shots to bog down vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

Booster shots — inoculations that come sometime after the original vaccinations for a disease — frequently are part of vaccine regimens, they say. That doctors and scientists now see a need for boosters against the coronavirus only reflects the fact that they continue to learn about the disease.

Dr. Jagdish Khubchandani, a public health professor at New Mexico State University, wrote in an email that news from the federal government about a booster is “a welcome step and right in line with what was known about this virus and the vaccines.”

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Joseph Duran, left, gives JoBeth Cash, 67, a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine Wednesday at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center’s specialty clinic. ‘Well, so far, so good,’ Cash said later. ‘I just was very anxious to get it.’



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Krista Gallegos, right, updates vaccine cards for Emily Baldridge, left, and Jerry Baldridge after they received a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine Wednesday at Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center's specialty clinic. The U.S. plans to make booster shots more widely available in late September as infections rise from the delta variant.

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