Quantcast

Letters to the editor, May, 6, 2014

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 7:00 pm | Updated: 12:14 am, Tue May 6, 2014.

Personal responsibility most important prevention measure

I’m sure that we are all saddened by the death of Suzanne LeBeau. I am equally sure that we are unlikely ever to know just what caused LeBeau to ride in front of a train.

Subscription Required

An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

You must login to view the full content on this page.

Thank you for reading 5 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 5 free articles, or you can get complete access to the online edition for $2.49 a week. If you need help, please contact our office at 505-986-3010 You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 No Alias Commenters must use their real names.
  • 2 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 3 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. and please turn off caps lock.
  • 4 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.

Welcome to the discussion.

9 comments:

  • Peter Neal posted at 10:09 pm on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    PeterNeal Posts: 290

    Something was done- there were bells ringing and lights flashing just a few feet away. Lebeau's failure to see or hear anything had more to do with a lack of awareness on her part than a lack of safety at the crossing IMHO.

     
  • Khal Spencer posted at 5:06 pm on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Khal Spencer Posts: 418

    I watched the video and it was hard to pick her out of the clutter. When she got really close to the tracks, it was obvious that she was not checking for a train. I suspect the engineer had about as much warning as you or I did when watching that sad video.

     
  • Pat Shackleford posted at 4:14 pm on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Pat Shackleford Posts: 569

    Thanks for clarifying. I wouldn't fault the engineer at all, but I wonder how far (in feet and seconds) she was from the tracks when he blew the horn.

     
  • Khal Spencer posted at 1:51 pm on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Khal Spencer Posts: 418

    I am pretty sure this is in a quiet zone, but according to all the reports I've read, due to the dire emergency, the engineer did use his train's horn.

     
  • Pat Shackleford posted at 1:11 pm on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Pat Shackleford Posts: 569

    "The extremely loud train horn was shouting."

    Actually, I don't think the train does blow its big horn at most in-city crossings. Khal could definitively answer that I'm sure. That aside, I agree that a society with limited funds for structural/mechanical safeguards can not implement every possible constraint necessary to save those lacking situational awareness, or caution, for personal safety.

     
  • Khal Spencer posted at 11:17 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Khal Spencer Posts: 418

    One does have to balance individual responsibility with public works efforts to improve safety. Those of us familiar with safety systems know that decisions on where to add more layers of safety, i.e., in this instance whether to add additional devices such as gates or lights, are decided on a graded approach, considering such things as the probability and frequency of a mishap and its severity of consequence. Many crossings are simple enough and don't warrant such treatment, which as we know, balances improvements in safety with added cost. I grew up out in the country east of Buffalo, NY. Most country crossings had simple crossbuck signs. Busier crossings or those with multiple tracks had lights or gates and lights. Trains moved fast out there and one had to pay attention.

    I've gotten a couple thoughtful posts to my blog, Los Alamos Bikes (link below), from local residents who make keen observations of this crossing, suggesting it warrants a re-examination of its safety system on the sidepath. Perhaps NMDOT will take the bait and look at this site again.

    http://tinyurl.com/oojmphv

     
  • Steve Salazar posted at 9:17 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Steve Salazar Posts: 873

    And my point was not to do every possible thing to prevent accidents, but to do something. The gates were known about, a conscience decision was made to not install them.

     
  • Peter Neal posted at 7:44 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    PeterNeal Posts: 290

    How about 8 ft. fencing along both sides of every busy roadway in the entire country, to prevent pedestrians from crossing and being killed- like the man killed yesterday a few hundred feet from where Lebeau was struck?
    I think the point Richard is making is that you can only do so much to protect people from every hazard- at some point we need to be responsible for our own safety, and be aware of our surroundings.

     
  • Steve Salazar posted at 6:45 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Steve Salazar Posts: 873

    Richard, gates and lights at the ped crossing are available. Sure they wouldn't eliminate the possibility that someone else might die this way. they would make the possibility much less.

    The RailRunner knew about the gates, they decided to save money. The decision worked out very well, right.

     

Write us! We welcome opinions from the readers. Send either letters (150 words) or My Views (600 words) to letters@sfnewmexican.com.

You can write a letter once a month or one My View every three months. We require the letter writer's name, address and phone number to be considered for publication. We also encourage writers to include a photo of themselves.

Any questions? Call Letters Editor Jennifer West at 986-3063.

Today’s New Mexican, July 25, 2014

To view a replica of today's printed edition of The Santa Fe New Mexican, you must be a subscriber. Get complete access to the online edition, including the print replica, at our low rate of $2.49 a week. That's about the price of a cup of coffee. Or get online and home delivery of our print edition for $3.24. Click here for details.  

Advertisement