Quantcast

Letters to the editor, April 23, 2014

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 11:15 pm | Updated: 12:20 am, Wed Apr 23, 2014.

Kennicott owes community an apology

Matt Kennicott’s reported audio remark disparaging the late Speak of the House Ben Luján and Spanish-speaking individuals is also offensive to people with disabilities. The use of the “R” word — retard — is deeply hurtful to people with intellectual, physical and emotional disabilities such as developmental disabilities, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and autism. The U.S. government has recently totally eliminated the term “mental retardation” (the derivative of retard) from all federal laws that protect and provide services and rights to this constituency.

Subscription Required

An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

You must login to view the full content on this page.

Thank you for reading 5 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 5 free articles, or you can get complete access to the online edition for $2.49 a week. If you need help, please contact our office at 505-986-3010 You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 No Alias Commenters must use their real names.
  • 2 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 3 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. and please turn off caps lock.
  • 4 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.

Welcome to the discussion.

1 comment:

  • Patricia Ortiz posted at 3:01 pm on Wed, Apr 23, 2014.

    Patricia Ortiz Posts: 1

    Why should one be ashamed of their accent, your accent tells where you’re from. Speaker Lujan’s accent spoke for the Spanish population of northern New Mexico, where the English language was foreign during his parent’s youth. Their children’s first language was Spanish and during Speaker Lujan’s youth and onward, the English language has become foremost in northern NM, a language the Spanish American of NNM became accustomed to in daily use; education, business, employment; yet, Lujan’s native Spanish language was an integral part of his life, no different from many other Hispano in northern NM. He did not speak English as would a Mid-Westerner, but he was intelligent, becoming the Speaker of the House. His accent tells the story of his environment in northern NM. If one is ignorant enough to insult a local accent, this is their problem. New Yorkers make fun of the accent of people from New Jersey, then there are the accents of southern states; Negros; hillbillies; and Texan drawls. The older Pueblo Indians too have an accent. Kennicott viewed Lujan’s English as sounding like a retard; given that “retard” is commonly used loosely for something another considers unacceptable. This was an irresponsible remark by Kennicott. Should Northern NM’s feel insulted by a transplant because they do not like our native accent? Not anymore than southerners; and other American groups who even have poor grammar. Our accent, whether or not we carry it, tells something of our 400 plus history in the U.S.

     

Write us! We welcome opinions from the readers. Send either letters (150 words) or My Views (600 words) to letters@sfnewmexican.com.

You can write a letter once a month or one My View every three months. We require the letter writer's name, address and phone number to be considered for publication. We also encourage writers to include a photo of themselves.

Any questions? Call Letters Editor Jennifer West at 986-3063.

Today’s New Mexican, July 23, 2014

To view a replica of today's printed edition of The Santa Fe New Mexican, you must be a subscriber. Get complete access to the online edition, including the print replica, at our low rate of $2.49 a week. That's about the price of a cup of coffee. Or get online and home delivery of our print edition for $3.24. Click here for details.  

Advertisement