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Our View: State can’t let train roll away

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Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2013 7:00 pm | Updated: 12:00 am, Sun Nov 17, 2013.

New Mexico should take the opportunity to lead in saving Amtrak train service for the northern part of the state.

Without action from the state Legislature and leadership from Gov. Susana Martinez, the historic Southwest Chief route likely will be no more. Last week, members of a House of Representatives interim transportation subcommittee heard from Amtrak and community representatives about what losing passenger train service would mean to towns such as Raton and Las Vegas — and that’s just the New Mexico portion of the line. The train could leave parts of Colorado and Kansas as well, leaving small Western towns without vital rail service along 600 miles of track. The loss of Amtrak would affect Santa Fe County as well, with loss of passenger train service at Lamy.

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Welcome to the discussion.

4 comments:

  • Pierce Knolls posted at 10:39 am on Wed, Nov 20, 2013.

    Mister Pierce Posts: 1156

    Amtrak loses $72 million a year in food services costs. They give away free wine, champagne, and cheese to long-distance passengers. They also give away free meals for employees. If they just managed food service a little better they could easily cover the costs of the necessary track maintenance.

    Why should Amtrak be able to give away free booze and still stick the states with the cost of track maintenance?

     
  • Pierce Knolls posted at 8:03 am on Mon, Nov 18, 2013.

    Mister Pierce Posts: 1156

    "... train service in Northern New Mexico brings in about $29 million a year in economic activity."

    The New Mexican has now printed this claim more than once. I wish they would print some of the numbers that support this claim. Maybe it's true, maybe not, but there's no way to know without looking at the underlying study, it's methodology, and it's sources.

     
  • Jennifer Bizzarro posted at 6:50 am on Mon, Nov 18, 2013.

    Jennifer_Bizzarro Posts: 327

    Mr. Salazar,

    "You libs"? Really? Are you suggesting that tax dollars be separated into different bank accounts according to political leanings? That would make for quite scuffle every time someone from wanted to turn on their lights. Worse yet, who would pay that Texan in the Roundhouse and her collection of clowns? "You people"?

    You may feel differently, but this is still a government that is intended to function for the greater good.

     
  • Steve Salazar posted at 3:36 pm on Sun, Nov 17, 2013.

    Steve Salazar Posts: 618

    If it's such a great idea, it should be a great enough idea for you libs to put your money into the track maintenance, right?

     
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