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Our View: On licenses, New Mexico leads

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Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2013 11:00 pm | Updated: 12:58 pm, Fri Jul 12, 2013.

Since her primary campaign in 2010, Gov. Susana Martinez’s signature issue has been repealing New Mexico’s groundbreaking law that allowed immigrants here illegally to obtain a driver’s license.

She has tried to revoke the privilege to drive in multiple legislative sessions, only to lose. Then she pushed voters to oust legislative incumbents who refused to vote for a driver’s license repeal. That also failed. Next year, Martinez will be running for re-election (with one more short legislative session between now and November 2014). Perhaps, in the months ahead, the stick-to-her-guns governor will let this signature issue fade. Because now, New Mexico appears prescient, rather than permissive.

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2 comments:

  • Joshua Veritas posted at 10:35 am on Wed, Jul 17, 2013.

    Joshua Veritas Posts: 1

    Your facts are wrong. North Carolina requires all driver's license applicants to demonstrate lawful presence to obtain a driver's license. In fact, HB 786, which would have granted driver's licenses to illegal aliens, was just defeated yesterday in the NC Assembly.

    As a result of granting driver's licenses to illegal aliens, New Mexico has become a magnet for not only illegal immigration (which financially harms NM to the tune of $717 million per year), but rampant fraud. Between August 2010 and April 2011, state investigators found that 37 percent of the 16,000 foreign national requests for appointments to obtain a driver's license came from out-of-state, most from Arizona, Georgia, and Texas. See Tim Maestas, Immigrant license fraud increases, KASA FOX, May 16, 2011, available at http://www.kasa.com/dpps/news/news_other_4/immigrant-license-fraud-increases_3813419. Investigators found one New Mexico phone number was used 228 times, a phone number with an Arizona area code was used 24 times, and one address in Albuquerque was used more than 70 times in the application process.

    Good public policy...I think not.

     
  • Pierce Knolls posted at 9:03 am on Fri, Jul 12, 2013.

    Mister Pierce Posts: 1166

    "For both public safety and humanitarian reasons, issuing legal driver’s licenses for all who use the road is smart policy."

    If you don't have a driver's license, you're not supposed to be using the road. Isn't that why we take driver's licenses away from repeat DWI offenders?

    Really, we all know that the reason the New Mexican supports giving driver's licenses to illegal aliens (a.k.a. undocumented Democrats) is because it makes it easier for the illegals to vote.

     
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