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Our View: Water — the issue that matters

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Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2013 11:00 pm | Updated: 12:24 am, Sun Oct 13, 2013.

Too many of today’s elections center on personalities, money and hot buttons — with voters choosing the candidate they find more approachable, the one with the most advertising or the one who isn’t on the wrong side of whatever controversy flares up during the campaign season.

Too often, the discussion fails to address what matters. In the recent Albuquerque mayoral race, for example, incumbent Richard Berry cruised to a crushing win despite the reality that the Duke City is lagging the nation in job creation and has allowed an out-of-control police force to operate. But Berry is someone voters like, and his opponents, Pete Dinelli and Paul Heh, didn’t have enough money to break through that pleasant image. Substantive issues never made it to the table for discussion. Given Berry’s favorables, only the perfect underdog running the perfect campaign could have pulled an upset. The race had neither.

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Welcome to the discussion.

1 comment:

  • Khal Spencer posted at 1:07 pm on Tue, Oct 15, 2013.

    Khal Spencer Posts: 418

    Industrial pollution of groundwater is yet another place where we might end up subsidizing industry and extracting the true cost of the resource from the public, because the public will have to pay for clean water, either by cleaning up contaminated groundwater or obtaining water elsewhere.

    As John Fleck in the Journal keeps telling us, much of our water resource is interconnected, i.e., ground water and surface water are not independent resources. Plus, deep, fossil water is not recharged rapidly. Do we have any additional independent hydrologists at Tech or UNM who can run watchdog for the public on these matters? By the way, we are told that geologist Doug Bland resigned and his "boss" supported these regulations. Is his "boss" a hydrologist? Lots left unsaid here.

    Bottom line is we live in the desert and climate models tell us that we are headed towards a warmer, potentially drier future, due both to increased evaporation rates and possible reduction in snowpack. The true cost of water, and the winners and losers from these board and commission decisions, must be made transparent to the public if we are to be an informed constituency.

     

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