Quantcast

Young dancer’s violent death leaves friends, family searching for answers

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:45 pm | Updated: 5:45 pm, Mon Jul 14, 2014.

ESPAÑOLA — Two days before his death, Victor Villalpando posted a disturbing rant on his Facebook page.

“HONESTLY I WISH PEOPLE DIDNT CARE ABOUT ME AS MUCH AS THEY DO,” he wrote in capital letters and without punctuation. “IM TIRED OF PEOPLE CARING ABOUT ME IM TIRED OF PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE ME HAPPY.”

Subscription Required

An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

You must login to view the full content on this page.

Thank you for reading 5 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 5 free articles, or you can get complete access to the online edition for $2.49 a week. If you need help, please contact our office at 505-986-3010 You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

More about

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 No Alias Commenters must use their real names.
  • 2 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 3 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. and please turn off caps lock.
  • 4 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.

Welcome to the discussion.

12 comments:

  • ct posted at 8:43 am on Sun, Jul 20, 2014.

    ct Posts: 6

    Espanola Police are definitely some wussies. Par for the course in New Mexico.

     
  • Warren Farrell posted at 2:00 pm on Sat, Jul 19, 2014.

    warrfarr Posts: 2

    Bravo! That was very intelligent and well written. I know many law enforcement officers, and what an eye opener the conversations with them are regarding their daily encounters on the job. I used to think it would be a good job to be in law enforcement and do my part to make a difference. NOT ANY MORE!
    I also know a lot of criminals; family members, old friends gone bad. The way they think, the fact that they refuse to take personal responsibility for their actions, which leads them to believe that every one with "more than they have" owes them something, thus justifying their criminal actions. Never ceases to amaze me.

     
  • Peter Neal posted at 8:03 am on Tue, Jul 15, 2014.

    PeterNeal Posts: 294

    I'm sure that "objective" citizens such as yourself and "Prince Michael" would be on such a citizens panel?

     
  • Chris Mechels posted at 10:13 pm on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    Chris Mechels Posts: 70

    I encourage Victor's family to file a lawsuit against the Espanola Police, for violation of their "Use of Force" policies. That is the only way to actually get all the information on the incident. The "internal investigation" by the State Police, and the Grand Jury controlled by DA Spence Pacheco, exist NOT to find the truth, but the HIDE the truth.

    Sad, but true, our police exist not to "Protect and Serve" but to "Serve Themselves". The State Police, which is "investigating" Victor's death, are NOT honest and objective. We need some other agency, controlled by the citizens, in investigate police shootings. The State Police, who have a long history of illegal shootings, simply cover up police homicides and other police crimes.

    We need some serious reform, as the New Mexico police are seriously out of control.

     
  • Prince Michael Jauregui posted at 4:45 pm on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    PrinceMichael Posts: 34

    Actually Mr. Agrallo, the SFNM shared a somewhat comprehensive
    article on the state's tragically high-number of alcohol-related death.
    Some -darkly- refer to this as, "Suicide on the Installment Plan".
    Or, in more regional terms: George Maloofitis.

     
  • Martin Agrallo posted at 4:27 pm on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    Martin Agrillo Posts: 1

    What happened to the age-old ethic against reporting suicides? A teenager becomes a "dancer" in headlines and tedious details of his family's history of drug addiction and overdoes become newsworthy -- when it becomes something that theoretically might be fixed by government-fixes-everything ideologues who paradoxically think government at once has too little power, but abuses the power it already has.

    While one apparent suicide becomes headline news - potentially inspiring others to find a shred of meaning in the way they check out by a vague promise that their life will finally have importance as at least a one-day news item - it remains unreported that New Mexico leads the nation in alcohol related deaths. Perhaps the details of that tragedy strike a little too close to home for those who decide what is news and what is not.

     
  • El Cie Vigil posted at 6:19 am on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    El Cie Vigil Posts: 10

    I think that police respond the way that they do because it is very dangerous out there. Guns are so easily available and they are are everywhere. It makes police work very dangerous and very difficult for them to control a situation and protect themselves. Shoot first and ask questions later seems to be the default. That or be killed yourself. That's not to say that there are many, many examples of rogue cops out there.

     
  • Donald Sure posted at 5:50 pm on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    Older and wiser Posts: 94

    See below.

     
  • Justin Kingsley posted at 5:26 pm on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    Justin OB Posts: 5

    "suicide by cop"? Its articles like this that are the reason the mainstream media has lost all credibility. These cops are trigger happy criminals and are unfot for duty. They belong in jail for murder and this "newspaper" ought to be ashamed of itself for being nothing more than a propaganda rag.

     
  • Donald Sure posted at 3:14 pm on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    Older and wiser Posts: 94

    Chris, please let us know which state law enforcement academy teaches officers to shoot other than center mass. Let us know what federal agencies also practice the "other than center mass" training model. I am sure there are none.

    What would you do in the critical fraction of a second where you have to decide if the threat to yourself or others is real? Would you wait until a bullet is fired your way before you decide to act? What happens if the person does discharge a round and you fail to respond, he fires a second round and strikes an innocent person, who do you blame then?

    I grow weary of those who choose to blame police for their response to potentially deadly situations having the luxury of hours, days, and weeks to analyze some facts, and much speculation.

    Frankly, the fault lies with one person in this situation. He alone chose the actions necessary to generate the response he was seeking. If you disagree, sign up, put on the uniform and badge, and go out and make the world a better place. I am sure you won't find it as easy as you think.

     
  • Prince Michael Jauregui posted at 8:38 am on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    PrinceMichael Posts: 34

    First, I'll establish Truth -Whom I represent- and work from there:
    The "Suicide By Cop", is being applied far too-often by cunning
    "Highly-Trained" Law-Enforcement "Professionals".
    The term is seemingly applied, when an unarmed subject
    is killed -often inexplicably- by, "Highly-Trained" "Professionals":

    Marine Veteran Ernesto Atencio, naked and beaten to death
    by nearly a dozen Maricopa County "Deputies".
    On video. No charges filed.

    Shelter-less person Hans Kevin Arellano, unarmed and murdered at
    point-blank range by a 13-year Santa Ana, CA., "Police Officer,
    after exclaiming -with hands in the air- "What are you gonna do
    now b***h?". The entire crime, captured on cell-phone.
    Charges, have never been filed.

    Active-Duty USAF-member and Iraqi-war veteran Elio Carrion was
    shot repeated in the back by San Bernardino "Deputy" Ivory Webb.
    On his knees, and following Webb's command to "Get up! Get Up!",
    Carrion was then shot multiple-times - in the back.
    Unbelievably, Webb would be cleared of all charges

    Personally? After being unlawfully arrested and illegally detained,
    WHILE JOGGING, I'll never trust not respect "Law Enforcement"
    at any level.
    Remember, thugs with badges, GOD sees EVERYTHING.

     
  • Chris Mechels posted at 8:13 am on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    Chris Mechels Posts: 70

    Victor's tragic death was totally unnecessary, and I wish the media would report on the reasons.

    Two police practices, common to New Mexico, lead directly to such deaths. First, their training has far too much emphasis on early introduction of firearms, to "control" the situation, and we see this in the media with Officers standing with their guns pointing at people. This poor practice leads directly to deaths such as in Victor's case. Second, the Officers in New Mexico are trained to shoot "center mass", for some very poor reasons, which go unexamined.

    So, in Victor's case, they responded to a report of "some kid who needs help", by killing the kid; because they "went for their guns" and shot him "center mass".

    The Europeans, and some States, do not train officers to shoot "center mass", because they realize that "protecting" the citizens does not involve killing them.

    Our media, and our Legislature, should be much more critical of our police practices, which need inspection and modification.

    Victor's death should be investigated by a "real" Grand Jury, with a "real" Independent Counsel, NOT our DA Spence Pacheco who always does her "dance of death" to clear the officers of criminal homicide. A "real" Grand Jury could look at Espanola "Use of Force" policy and Espanola Police Training, which led to Victor's death.

    Until we choose to "learn" from such shootings they will continue.

     

Follow The Santa Fe New Mexican

Today’s New Mexican, July 28, 2014

To view a replica of today's printed edition of The Santa Fe New Mexican, you must be a subscriber. Get complete access to the online edition, including the print replica, at our low rate of $2.49 a week. That's about the price of a cup of coffee. Or get online and home delivery of our print edition for $3.24. Click here for details.  

Advertisement