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Mustang whisperer could have answers for BLM’s horse dilemma

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5 comments:

  • Allan Ladd posted at 12:29 pm on Sun, Apr 27, 2014.

    Ladd Posts: 8

    "Without predators, the herd sizes grew rapidly. The BLM rounded up horses periodically to reduce the herd sizes and offered the mustangs for adoption at low prices. Some of the mustangs rounded up were crippled, old or ugly — not the kind people wanted to adopt. More and more unwanted horses ended up in BLM long-term holding pastures, where the agency is obligated to care for them until they die. The tough little mustangs often live into their 30s." here is the essence of the lie the mass
    media keeps repeating sans evidence. Predators aren't the only population control -drought, stress induced infertiility caused by BLM roundups are others. It is impossible they are overpopulating ! All the stallions in BLM holding have been gelded. We don't need a horse whisperer to lure them into extinction with PZP. We
    need to return wild horses to the range and drive the welfare cattle off!

     
  • Karen Strickholm posted at 4:32 pm on Tue, Apr 8, 2014.

    KarenSantaFe Posts: 2

    Sorry for my typos. :-(

     
  • Karen Strickholm posted at 4:32 pm on Tue, Apr 8, 2014.

    KarenSantaFe Posts: 2

    Big kudos go to reporter Staci Matlock for this interested, well-researched piece. I hope you will do a follow-up in a few months.

    I, too, wish I was young enough (an knew how to expertly ride a horse!) to apply for a job managing a small herd of wild horses. What an amazing opportunity!

     
  • Marybeth Devlin posted at 8:06 am on Tue, Apr 8, 2014.

    MarybethDevlin Posts: 2

    H. Alan Day's wild-horse sanctuary and low-stress handling-approach evidence his enlightened thinking and generosity of spirit. I wish him every success.

    However, BLM's disinformation must be exposed. There is no wild-horse overpopulation. For most herds, the maximum population is set below minimum viable population. There are too-few mustangs on the range, and too-many mustangs in captivity. BLM created this crisis, all the while rejecting "people with constructive ideas."

    BLM does "have the stomach" for slaughter. Three weeks ago, BLM sold 37 wild horses to a slaughterhouse in Canada. BLM speaks sweetly, acts treacherously.

    The contraceptive PZP-22 is effective and long-acting; but BLM prefers helicopter-stampedes -- violent rodeos that cause not only injuries but fatalities.

    Until 2005, BLM counted sales-for-slaughter as "adoptions." After 2005, only "forever-family" placements qualified. Consequently, adoptions "declined."

    BLM claims horses have no natural predators. Cougars and wolves are horses' natural predators. BLM exterminated them.

    Equids evolved in North America. They are a native species. BLM dishonors that fact, instead telling the tale of how Spanish Conquistadors introduced horses to the New World. However, Native American oral history confirms that horses were already here when the explorers arrived.

    BLM disparages captive mustangs as "crippled, old, or ugly." But even crippled wild horses are beautiful, noble creatures, worthy of respect, having survived BLM's brutal roundups and shameful neglect. Old horses, it turns out, play a key role in stabilizing herd-population. Ironically, BLM targets them for removal.

     
  • James Fitzgerald posted at 2:06 pm on Sun, Apr 6, 2014.

    Jim Fitzgerald Posts: 21

    Were I young again, I would be standing in line to be included in such a visionary project.

     

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