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Immigrant charges spike in New Mexico

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Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 11:00 pm | Updated: 11:19 am, Thu Nov 14, 2013.

Federal prosecutions of immigration offenses jumped 46 percent in New Mexico in the first of 11 months of fiscal year 2013, the fastest growth of any of the nation’s 94 judicial districts, a new report shows.

New Mexico’s federal judicial district recorded 5,999 criminal immigration prosecutions through the end of August, the latest data available, according to the report by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC), a nonpartisan center based at Syracuse University that tracks federal government enforcement activities.

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6 comments:

  • Mark Ordonez posted at 4:33 pm on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    marcoordonez Posts: 482

    We're way past that for the 12 million (wink wink) that are here. If we could only get Marcela Diaz to really help her people and try get them to assimalate a little better or at all. One example; go pick up your kids at a local elementary school and tell me who isn't following protocal or direction from the teachers at the end of the day.

     
  • Andrew Lucero posted at 10:29 am on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    Andrew Lucero Posts: 101

    [thumbup]

     
  • Andrew Lucero posted at 10:29 am on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    Andrew Lucero Posts: 101

    [thumbup]

     
  • Mark Ordonez posted at 9:46 am on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    marcoordonez Posts: 482

    What is so difficult to add "UNDOCUMENTED" to your headline. Why slant it to cause fear in the documented immigrant community? What service does this provide that your paper not acknowledge all this State does for legal immigrants?

     
  • Mark Ordonez posted at 9:35 am on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    marcoordonez Posts: 482

    Jesus Uriel! Please stop with this drivel. You and your paper must stop interjecting opinion AND lumping ALL immigrants together.

    "The numbers don’t necessarily mean more undocumented immigrants are coming through New Mexico." It also DOESN'T mean LESS are coming in either so why write this opinion?

    "The percentage increase in New Mexico surprised some immigrant rights groups that have considered the state immigrant friendly."

    You mean "that have considered the state "UNDOCUMENTED" immigrant friendly. With that conscious omission you fail to honor those that went through the LEGAL process and make it sound as though NM isn't LEGAL immigrant friendly. Why would you slander our state with ALL we do for ALL immigrants. This State does more for undocumnted immigrants than the other 49 and still it's not enough for Diaz, writer's like yourself, Hispanic named lawmakers and advocates. The Mexican President even came to the U.S. and wagged his finger at our Congress when his country has some of the most draconian undocumented immigrant rights laws. What other country would allow people to illegally migrate into their country, give them jobs, education, assistance, medical care, driver's licenses, citizenship, in some cases the ability to a be a criminal in the community that has taken them in, by committing dui, assault, drug offenses, rape, robbery, and NOT deport.
    Marcela, stop being rude. Your distaste for NM is insulting to the citizens who have taken you and your Pisano’s in. Never do I hear a word of gratitude when quoted.

     
  • Pat Shackleford posted at 12:46 am on Thu, Nov 14, 2013.

    Pat Shackleford Posts: 410

    Couldn't Mexico do more to educate their citizens about the physical dangers and illegality of making unauthorized (undocumented?) crossings of the U.S. border? There would then be fewer immigrant prosecutions and deportations. Win-win!

     
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