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Detention center puts immigration spotlight on New Mexico town

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  • Detention center puts immigration spotlight on New Mexico town

    A sign Thursday at the Java House in Artesia indicates patrons last week preferred sending ‘immigrants back to origin.’ The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center is now being used to house immigrant women and their children who have crossed illegally into the United States. Luis Sánchez Saturno/The New Mexican

Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 10:00 pm | Updated: 7:26 am, Mon Jul 14, 2014.

ARTESIA — Oil, farming and high school football are usually the hottest topics in this dusty town of 11,300 people. But now Artesia finds itself in the middle of the national debate on immigration policy.

Between 400 and 500 immigrants accused of illegally entering the United States were being held last week in a government compound here that, ironically enough, trains every U.S. Border Patrol agent. All of the immigrants being detained in Artesia are mothers and their children, a total of 191 families as of Friday.

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7 comments:

  • Jim H. Madrid posted at 12:17 am on Fri, Jul 18, 2014.

    Satigo Posts: 7

    Justin Kingsley, I do not believe or respond to unqualified inferences, i.e., unjustified comments. You ask me to justify your inferences and assume I am playing politics. So, unless you can support/qualify your inferences don't expect me or anyone to believe you. You are free to make inferences, but those that may read what you wrote last Wednesday, will likely be critical of whatever you write. Qualify your comments so that I, and others, can begin to believe you. I hope I am not asking for to much because your comments are interesting and I, and others, would like to see them referenced properly.

     
  • Justin Kingsley posted at 11:31 pm on Wed, Jul 16, 2014.

    Justin OB Posts: 5

    They are illegal immigrants. Just ask the people who actually came here legallly and went through the proper procedure. Its a slap in their faces and the faces of every american who obeys the law. Since when are they "refugees"? This is a new reference being used by the lawless obama administration and the lapdog lib propagandist media

     
  • Jim H. Madrid posted at 1:43 pm on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    Satigo Posts: 7

    No, we don't always know how our tax dollars are being spent, you are right. What we do know is that these refugees are being "detained" on "our dime" and some people don't like it, because they think of them as illegal immigrants, which they are not.

     
  • Jim H. Madrid posted at 1:37 pm on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    Satigo Posts: 7

    Morally, we MUST support Refugees and not treat or think of them as illegals. My take is one that should given due consideration...that's all I ask.

    Yes, what influence the U.S. has had in Central and South American countries has done little to help their general population progress and I think it has to do with how moneys are "divid" and the greedy power of those of influence on both sides of the fence. But, this has little to do with our moral obligation to our present refugees from these countries.

     
  • Mark Ordonez posted at 9:22 am on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    marcoordonez Posts: 656

    "There are those that complain about the dollar cost to us. Yes it costs, but at least we know how this aid is being spent. "
    Do we ever know how the Government "REALLY" spends our money?

     
  • Carl Logan posted at 8:36 am on Mon, Jul 14, 2014.

    shockednotawed Posts: 2

    Mr. Madrid, your take seems very reasonable.

    The U.S. has had position and influence in all the Central and South American countries; more often than not, that influence has not bee to the benefit of the people (drugs, Contras, school of the Americas, Pinochet, Zetas, United Fruit, the Dulles boys, etc)

    Let's treat this situation with grace and effect, and, practice a foreign policy that allows people to survive/advance without our support/meddling

     
  • Jim H. Madrid posted at 9:58 pm on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    Satigo Posts: 7

    Immigrant is defined as a person that leaves his or her country to seek permanent residence in another. These people are refugees, people who are running away from their country because of a bad situation. These people walked across the border and were not kept from coming in by a wire or any other barrier placed to keep them out. They didn't "jump the fence" nor have they applied for citizenship or travel or work permit, so immigration laws do not apply. What does apply is our moral obligation to help them with temporary accommodation until the problem they fear has lessened to a reasonable degree. They are not immigrants especially illegal immigrants, they are refugees.
    There are those that complain about the dollar cost to us. Yes it costs, but at least we know how this aid is being spent. Much aid to other countries is not as well accounted.

     

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