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LET IT FLOW Slow-water ‘pulse’ brings a steady trickle of water down Santa Fe River

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Posted: Sunday, May 5, 2013 7:00 pm | Updated: 12:29 am, Tue May 7, 2013.

The Santa Fe River will receive a steady trickle over the next few days as the city allows some water to flow through municipal reservoirs and downstream.

City water staff planned to start the slow-water “pulse” of 2 cubic feet per second on Friday afternoon. The pulse will continue until Monday, when staff will re-evaluate water inflow to the city’s upper McClure Reservoir, said Santa Fe River coordinator Brian Drypolcher. If the inflow is high enough, water staff will allow up to 4 cfs down the river for a few days.

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Welcome to the discussion.

6 comments:

  • Gregorio Ambrosini posted at 4:33 pm on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    Gregorio Ambrosini Posts: 56

    How sensitive is this to cuss words? Or should I say Politically incorrect words.

     
  • Gregorio Ambrosini posted at 4:31 pm on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    Gregorio Ambrosini Posts: 56

    The river is trashed under the bridges at Guadalupe, and Sandoval. People are such pigs.

    I bet they shut that water down just as soon as they realize we're in a drought. Oh yeah, first they have to stop allowing new developments. Isn't it great wasting water during a drought. City Hall must feel like Nero. Fiddle on you more ons. [sad]

     
  • ernest green posted at 12:38 pm on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    ernest green Posts: 20

    Desert willows are native to the southwest. Are the new plantings some other type of willow tree?

     
  • magic505 posted at 8:28 am on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    magic505 Posts: 2

    [thumbup]

     
  • Mark Miera posted at 8:19 am on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    magic84 Posts: 37

    That a lot of water for NON-NATIVE Tree.[sad]

     
  • sfobserver posted at 7:39 am on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    sfobserver Posts: 63

    Why are willow being planted? Arent they non-native? And let's be clear: the city wants to release over 3billion 25 million gallons of water at 4 cubic feet per second(csf). That sounds and is a lot more accurate idea of what is flowing down the river--3 billion plus gallons for non native plants...
    I cannot feel good about this until the city recycles this water and stops putting in non native species and removes those that are there.
    When will the city stop wasting water through unnecessary use of electricity including heat at the Chavez center w/ doors open and air conditioning at Salvador Perez (40 degrees out) w/ doors and windows open? What about the city's watering of parks at 10AM and afterward? Why isnt the public works dept addressing these waste of energy and water?

     

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