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EARTH WEEK Earth Week: State and local laws help protect night from light pollution

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Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 6:05 pm | Updated: 12:20 am, Fri Apr 26, 2013.

Gaze into the sky on a moonless night in April in the Northern Hemisphere, and pick out Hydra, the sea serpent, Regulus, the “heart of the lion” star in the Leo constellation, and Crater, which represents the goblet of the Greek god Apollo.

Of course, depending on where you are — standing under a streetlight, say, or in many urban and suburban environments — the stars can be hard to see. Light pollution (light emitted at night that extends beyond the horizontal plane, shining up instead of down) affects not only our ability to stargaze, but also the environment and safety: Certain lights throw off glares that can actually make it harder to see at night, and many lights left on at night waste energy and can confuse wildlife.

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2 comments:

  • karl hardy posted at 11:12 am on Thu, Apr 25, 2013.

    karl hardy Posts: 42

    Just try to get the law enforced - I was told it was the law but nothing the police could do about it - I would have to pay a lawyer to go to court to get it enforced.

     
  • Emil_Saure posted at 11:34 pm on Wed, Apr 24, 2013.

    Emil_Saure Posts: 6

    Yes, we have light pollution laws but it's almost impossible to get police or governments ( local or state) to enforce them. The fines for violations are ridiculously low and do not increase for subsequent violations. Most corporate light polluters just write of the tiny fines as a cost of doing business.

     
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