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Advocates push mayoral hopefuls on immigration

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Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2014 9:00 pm | Updated: 10:48 am, Mon Jan 20, 2014.

Local governments across the U.S. are working with immigration officials to identify and deport undocumented immigrants. But here in Santa Fe, the three candidates running for mayor say they want to keep the city a friendly place for immigrants, regardless of their legal status.

All three mayoral candidates — Javier Gonzales and City Councilors Patti Bushee and Bill Dimas — say they support a resolution passed by the City Council in 1999 forbidding use of city resources in identifying and apprehending undocumented immigrants. Immigration activists say they welcome the candidates’ support of the resolution but say they should look for more ways to help prevent deportations.

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2 comments:

  • henry griswold posted at 11:05 am on Fri, Jan 24, 2014.

    henry griswold Posts: 218

    all countries that have let in masses of immigrants in recent yrs have seen the social costs greatly rise. the expenses greatly outweigh the taxes & contributions brought in. being born here should not make one a legal citizen...........

     
  • Lance Johnson posted at 10:44 am on Sun, Jan 19, 2014.

    lgjhere Posts: 7

    Let’s face it, this immigration thing is a 20th century issue that has slopped over into the 21st century. The time has come to finally resolve it in an intelligent fashion, as three-fourths of Americans favor and Obama confronts head-on. A new award-winning worldwide book/ebook that helps explain the role, struggles, and contributions of immigrants and minorities is "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to Understand Crazy American Culture, People, Government, Business, Language and More.” It paints a revealing picture of America for anyone who will benefit from a better understanding. Endorsed by ambassadors, educators, and editors, it also informs those who want to learn more about the last remaining superpower and how we compare to other nations on many issues.
    As the book points out, immigrants and minorities are a major force in America. Immigrants and the children they bear account for 60 percent of our nation’s population growth and own 11 percent of US businesses and are 60 percent more likely to start a new business than native-born Americans. They represent 17 percent of all new business owners (in some states more than 30 percent). Foreign-born business owners generate nearly one-quarter of all business income in California and nearly one-fifth in New York, Florida, and New Jersey. In fact, forty percent of Fortune 500 companies were started by an immigrant or a child of an immigrant, creating 10 million jobs and seven out of ten top brands .

     

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