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MARIJUANA BILL House passes bill that makes marijuana penalties in New Mexico less harsh

Fines would increase, with less potential for jail time

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Posted: Monday, March 11, 2013 9:00 pm | Updated: 11:46 pm, Tue Mar 12, 2013.

Adults possessing less than 8 ounces of marijuana in New Mexico would no longer receive any jail time under a bill passed Monday by the House.

The House voted 37-33 in favor of House Bill 465, sponsored by Rep. Emily Kane, D-Albuquerque. The bill would reduce penalties for possession of up to 4 ounces to a civil penalty with increasing fines while eliminating the potential for jail time for any amount up to 8 ounces.

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Welcome to the discussion.

10 comments:

  • Alfred Padilla posted at 12:49 pm on Thu, Mar 14, 2013.

    Xenoace32 Posts: 272

    Its good for business to keep laws on the books that creates criminals. Not good seeing all our men/women in blue hiding out at Ducan Donuts. They must be out and about catching the perverted hated disgusting needs to go to prison because he smoked a joint crazy person. Sheesh

     
  • Lisa Belinda posted at 11:21 am on Thu, Mar 14, 2013.

    Lisa Belinda Posts: 6

    Here's the way I see it. The government has marijuana classified as a Schedule 1 drug along with heroin and cocaine, which actually do belong there. So the gov is either going to have to own the fact that this classification is wrong wrong wrong and not based on science but some cops' and politicians' anecdotal descriptions of crazed weapon-wielding potheads trying to perpetrate some kind of mayhem snd derived from viewing the ridiculous propaganda flick "Reefer Madness" and calling it science. The gov is wrong and they just ought to own it and make it right with objective science, give us the facts, if we don't already have them from our own experience, and let the will of the informed public be heard. I like my government to make decisions about my choices based on fact, not feelings.

     
  • dregstudios posted at 2:27 pm on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    dregstudios Posts: 2

    Marijuana is the safest drug with actual benefits for the user as opposed to alcohol which is dangerous, causes addiction, birth defects, and affects literally every organ in the body. Groups are organizing all over the country to speak their minds on reforming pot laws. I drew up a very cool poster featuring Uncle Willie Nelson and The Teapot Party for the cause which you can check out on my artist’s blog at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/01/vote-teapot-2011.html Drop in and let me know what you think!

     
  • Joe Montoya posted at 9:26 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    Joe_Montoya Posts: 60

    The bill appears to be a step in the right direction, but you are going to have to convince her majesty on the merits of the bill. She threatens to veto it. The bill is dead onarrival.

     
  • Selina Serrano posted at 9:26 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    dreamweaver Posts: 7

    agree!

     
  • Selina Serrano posted at 6:56 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    dreamweaver Posts: 7

    have you ever noticed you don't need a test to tell when someone is on heroine, cocaine, crack, or meth?

     
  • Ed Campbell posted at 5:59 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    Ed Campbell Posts: 17

    Perish the thought our pols have courage enough to decriminalize cannabis altogether.

     
  • Gregorio Ambrosini posted at 4:26 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    Ambro Posts: 37

    I'm sure Suzanna calls us old time pot smokers "drug addicts". She should respect her elders.

     
  • Pat Shackleford posted at 2:53 am on Tue, Mar 12, 2013.

    Pat Shackleford Posts: 394

    "...once stopped a car full of teen pot smokers who responded by attacking him with a screwdriver". I'd hate to encounter those teens on meth. That'd be harsh!

     
  • Daniel Martinez posted at 10:29 pm on Mon, Mar 11, 2013.

    RightNJust4US Posts: 1

    Dear Gov.Martinez I have yet to see the slightest amount of change in our communty's use of cannabis, despite your infringing efforts. I have seen nothing but out dated biased scare tactics from you and numerous conservative figures. The facts are right infront you,yet you continue a flawed Reganistic approach to our states "illicit drug use". Your public has spoken, if you veto this bill along with HB Memorial 80,you deny your very community a life changing opppertunity to advance economically while opening the door to a new drug policy... I have seen lives and relationships ruined by Meth and Alcohol in my own San Juan county, and the lack of through cannabis alone. The question shouldn't be wether to pass or not, but rather are you a Gov. for the people or just another missinformed/unrealistic bought out political head? As a fellow hispanic conservative I urge you to consider the advancement of the very lives you represent before signing.

     
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Key issues facing lawmakers

ECONOMICS

Backdrop: New Mexico gained only 1,700 jobs during the past year ending in November. That's a growth rate of 0.2 percent and the lowest in the region. New Mexcio's unemployment rate was 6.4 percent in November compared with 6.7 percent a year earlier.

Proposals: Gov. Susana Martinez proposed expanding programs that can help bring nurses, dentists and other medical providers to rural areas. She also wants to provide $7.5 million for an endowment fund to attract top porfessors and researchers at colleges and universities. The governor recommends broadening tax incentivies to encourage startup companies as well as research and development. Democrats are pushing to increase the stat's minimum wage, which has been $7.50 an hour since 2009. Some lawmakers want automatic cost-of-living increases in the wage rate.

BUDGET

Backdrop: The current state budget is $5.9 billion, and revenues are expected to reach nearly $6.2 billion in the fiscal year starting in July. That provides about $239 million in "new money" for lawmakers and the governor for budget increases and to offset tax cuts. The state has cash reserves of more than $500 million, but that could shrink because of accounting discrepancies stretching back more than six years.

Proposals: Martinez has recommended a 3 percent budget increase compared with about 4 percent proposed by the Legislative Finance Committee. Martinez proposes targeted increases for hard-to-fill jobs such as state police. But the legislative panel advocates across-the-board raises for all state agency workers and educators, with higher amounts for those in certain jobs, including judges, state police and social workers.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Backdrop: About $600 million in bond financing is available for capital improvement projects. Some of that goes for specific purposes, including public schools and projects on tribal lands. However, much of the financing will be divvied up for new projects. 

Proposals: Martinez proposes earmarking about $112 million in bond proceeds for water projects across the state. The governor also recommends creatinga  new fund that can provide emergency assistance to communities with drinking water problems. The Legislative Finance Committee has recommended $10 million in bond financing for highway maintenance and $6 million for a road to the state's spaceport.

EDUCATION

Backdrop: Public schools, colleges and universities get nearly $3 out of every $5 in the operating budget. The high school graduation rate was 70 percent in the last school year, and nearly half of graduates enrolling in state colleges in 2011 and 2012 required remedial courses.

Proposals: Martinez will renew a proposal to require schools to hold back third-graders who can't read proficiently. Some Democrats and a coalition of social advocacy groups want to earmark part of the yearly payout from a state permanent fund to provide more money for early-childhood education. Lawmakers also will consider ways to shore up a lottery-financed college scholarship program. Some proposals would change the program to make the aid need-based and provide a flat dollar amount for scholarships. 

The Associated Press

Session dates - 2014

• December 16, 2013 - January 17 Legislation may be prefiled

• January 21 Opening day (noon)

• February 5 Deadline for introduction

• February 20 Session ends (noon)

• March 12 Legislation not acted upon by governor is pocket vetoed

• May 21 Effective date of legislation not a general appropriation bill or a bill carrying an emergency clause or other specified date

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