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How Gates pulled off the Common Core revolution

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Posted: Saturday, June 7, 2014 11:55 pm | Updated: 12:41 am, Sun Jun 8, 2014.

The pair of education advocates had a big idea, a new approach to transform every public-school classroom in America. By early 2008, many of the nation’s top politicians and education leaders had lined up in support.

But that wasn’t enough. The duo needed money — tens of millions of dollars, at least — and they needed a champion who could overcome the politics that had thwarted every previous attempt to institute national standards.

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1 comment:

  • Stephen Hauf posted at 10:52 am on Sun, Jun 8, 2014.

    willabee Posts: 25

    Lately I have been reflecting on how the world of literacy has changed since I first stepped into a classroom in 1985. Back then there was research being conducted on CAI ( Computer Assisted Instruction) early results that were reported were not encouraging, but then monotone audio and mono color illuminated text and images were the norm. Back then Google, Yahoo, Twitter, and Facebook could hardly be imagined. Back then the internet was a project of the U.S. Department of Defense shared with some Universities. Back then teaching students the mechanics of reading and writing was enough. The literacy has grown into a world of IOD (Information On Demand) and thanks to texting a plethora of acronyms that are heavily loaded with meaning. I support the Common Core because the standards go beyond mechanics and if use well teaching practice show students how to understand information. The common core standards of literacy if taught well may help students distinguish facts from propaganda. I wonder on this latter point if that is why some politicians are running as fast as they can away from the Common Core. Finally it is hardly fair to compare standardized test results from states whose tests use less rigorous standards with those who use the more rigorous Common Core. For example to rank New Mexico which uses the common core against Texas which does not is not precise or fair.

     

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