Quantcast

Fracking boom brings deadly side effect

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size
  • Deadly side effect to fracking boom

    In this photo made on Saturday, March 1, 2014, a truck drives through an intersection in Clarksburg, W. Va. In March of 2013, a truck carrying drilling water overturned near the same intersection onto a car driven by Lucretia Mazzei, killing her two sons, 7-year-old Nicholas Mazzei-Saum and his 8-year-old brother Alexander Mazzei-Saum. An analysis of traffic fatalities in the busiest new oil and gas-producing counties in the U.S. shows a sharp rise in deaths that experts say is related to the drilling boom. Keith Srakocic/The Associated Press

Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 11:52 am | Updated: 11:18 pm, Mon May 5, 2014.

CLARKSBURG, W.Va. — Booming production of oil and natural gas has exacted a little-known price on some of the nation’s roads, contributing to a spike in traffic fatalities in states where many streets and highways are choked with large trucks and heavy drilling equipment.

An Associated Press analysis of traffic deaths and U.S. census data in six drilling states shows that in some places, fatalities have more than quadrupled since 2004 — a period when most American roads have become much safer even as the population has grown.

Subscription Required

An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

You must login to view the full content on this page.

Thank you for reading 5 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 5 free articles, or you can get complete access to the online edition for $2.49 a week. If you need help, please contact our office at 505-986-3010 You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?

Login Now

Need an online subscription?

Subscribe

Login

More about

More about

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 No Alias Commenters must use their real names.
  • 2 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 3 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. and please turn off caps lock.
  • 4 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.

Welcome to the discussion.

2 comments:

  • Joseph Hempfling posted at 9:33 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    joehempfling Posts: 189

    And to think they want to "knowingly" bring this same problem; traffic congestion, the possibility of truck on car accidents to little rural Lamy is unconscionable if not criminal.
    And must be stopped because literally it will become an accident waiting to happen.
    Not to mention the likely-hood of a spill, and contamination of the community's one and only water well, only 100 ft. from the truck to rail transfer point. Speak Truth to Power and stop the insanity.

     
  • Khal Spencer posted at 7:41 am on Tue, May 6, 2014.

    Khal Spencer Posts: 418

    Three times as many truck trips, soaring fatalities, and the need to rebuild roads. I wonder if any of these, as well as the potential for cross contaminating groundwater by opening up new permeability within and between sediment formations, were built into the models the fracking industry uses to sell this technology to the gullible public and our pols.

    There is no free lunch, and people need to stop believing in such things.

     

Follow The Santa Fe New Mexican

Today’s New Mexican, July 24, 2014

To view a replica of today's printed edition of The Santa Fe New Mexican, you must be a subscriber. Get complete access to the online edition, including the print replica, at our low rate of $2.49 a week. That's about the price of a cup of coffee. Or get online and home delivery of our print edition for $3.24. Click here for details.  

Advertisement