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Los Alamos scientists: School grading system is unclear

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  • Task force finds school evaluation results aren’t clear

    Retired Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Bill Wadt, right, explains Monday how he read and edited several scientific reports throughout his professional career, but he did not fully understand the findings of the School Report Card after reading the report. Clyde Mueller/The New Mexican

Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 9:00 pm | Updated: 12:12 am, Fri Dec 20, 2013.

LOS ALAMOS — When Gov. Susana Martinez introduced her A-F system for grading New Mexico schools in early 2012, critics said it would take a rocket scientist to figure out the complex formula.

However, even a committee of five Los Alamos physicists, statisticians and math experts had difficulty after running the numbers and crunching figures in an effort to understand why one of their school district’s seven schools received a grade of C.

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4 comments:

  • Elizabeth Guss posted at 11:18 am on Thu, Dec 19, 2013.

    Elizabeth Guss Posts: 2

    Perhaps our schools would be better served by teaching reading, writing, and math and critical thinking and analysis using these skills rather than test-taking topics. Testing practice is now taking up at least a day a week at many schools and it underlies every lesson plan based on "CCSS" (Common Core Ctate Standards). These ridiculous "standards" are the worst of meaningless jargon: most as written are entirely immeasurable and not quantifiable.

    Given that we have an Education "Secretary Designate" (still) who does not meet the NM State Constitution's requirements for the position, should we expect anything better? Ms. Skandera's formula for New Mexico's schools is "follow Florida", but Florida is hardly at the forefront of educational progress and performance.

    I hope our legislators will listen to Senator Tim Keller's proposals to get out of the "testing trap" that wastes our kids' time and our teachers' talents. Teaching kids to bubble a, b, c, or d is not going to develop our children into the creative dreamers and analytical thinkers we need for the future.

     
  • Ron Romero posted at 6:04 am on Wed, Dec 18, 2013.

    RonRomero Posts: 38

    Let's not!

     
  • Steve Salazar posted at 2:38 pm on Tue, Dec 17, 2013.

    Steve Salazar Posts: 625

    So do the "rocket scientists" have any solutions to go along with their agenda?

     
  • Steve Salazar posted at 8:55 am on Tue, Dec 17, 2013.

    Steve Salazar Posts: 625

    Let's just go back to NCLB!

     
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