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The Home Page: Working on climate change at home

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Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 7:00 pm | Updated: 11:43 pm, Sat Jul 12, 2014.

Although climate change has been in the forefront of scientific discussion for decades, it seems only recently that the media and the public at large have begun a serious discussion about it.

Riding on the coattails of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report this year, the U.S. government released its own study recently, drawing acute attention to the problem of climate change as a real and present threat to our health, comfort, food and water security, and national security. All of this — based on decades of scientific study from around the world, and the measured data of rising average temperatures, increasing severity of droughts, wildfires and increasing intensity of storms — leads us to the question: What is next?

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1 comment:

  • Jay Mulberry posted at 10:37 am on Sun, Jul 13, 2014.

    jaymulberry Posts: 1

    This is an extremely important point that deserves more attention than it gets. Not only are the authors correct in what they say about building construction and maintenance as means toward an environmental end, work in that are would give a tremendous bottom-up boost to the economy. The kinds of work involved would provide above-minimum-wage salaries for hundreds of thousands of Americans on jobs that can't be shipped to China or, to a large extent, mechanized.

     
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